Wednesday, April 27, 2011

A Polish woman wants to work as a prostitute but becomes trapped

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A human trafficking story once a week. I will fulfill my oath. And, I finally found out a proper translation of ‘aangifte doen bij the politie’. That should be: lodging a complaint at/to the police. That’s most accurate. So, that means I will have to change some text soon on my blog. Okay, the new story. A very short one. It’s from one of the Nationaal Rapporteur’s reports. The third one actually, the one from 2004 (see page 116 for the story).

http://www.bnrm.nl/Images/Rapportage%203%20(Ned)_2004_tcm63-83115.pdf
Mensenhandel — Derde rapportage van de Nationaal Rapporteur (2004), page 116
The Polish Z. gets from Y., via a friend, the question if she wants to work in the Netherlands as a prostitute. Y. indicates that the earnings will be split equally between them and that he will offer her protection and a workplace. Y. impressed upon Z that she could earn 270 Euro per day. At that moment she lives of 38 Euro per month and has in prospect a salary of at most 54 Euro per month. With this image in mind Z agrees with the proposal. After arriving in the Netherlands she lives in with Y. She is being locked in however and can make contact with nobody. Each evening she has to work as a prostitute and Y. molests her physically and sexually when he is not satisfied about the earnings. Also bodyguard X. beats her if she doesn’t work well. He verifies how many clients she has per night and how long they are with her. Contrary to the agreement she has to hand over all the earned money to Y., who then gives a part to X. After working nonstop for one and a half month Z asks for a couple of free days to rest a little. Y. refuses and when Z. then has to keep on working while she is ill she decides to leave. With the help of another prostitute she is able to flee and lodge a complaint to the police. (…)
The story ends when she is given a lawyer by the JOS project. The suspect is sentenced to six years in jail and a fine of 679 Euro. Also X is convicted.

And, what have we learned?

That also women who want to work as prostitutes can end up in bad circumstances.

And what have I learned?

To never visit a prostitute again because she can be a victim of human trafficking.

I have to reiterate this to myself every week because I will forget. And, translating a story into English makes it better to understand for me. And I have to acknowledge that I thought about visiting the Red Light District in Amsterdam again last Friday. I have to persist. My conscience will win. I am a righteous person.

3 comments:

Stephen Paterson said...

Can you tell me anywhere were I've "denied the existence of forced prostitution in the United Kingdom" as your link in the left hand column states?

Donkey said...

Well, you sort of do that. You say that a big problem of human trafficking largely doesn't exist. You acknowledge the existence of 70 victims a year. I think if you would say that of the Netherlands that we be laughably low. If you want to I could alter the name of the link a tiny bit. But it wouldn't matter.

I think I have to convince myself first that there is a big human trafficking problem in the Netherlands.

I found an interesting story on rechtspraak.nl about Hungarian prostitutes. I will post about that soon. This one is from very recent: 2009.

Anonymous said...

I sometimes read your blog, Mr Paterson.
I would consider "Donkey's" assessment to be a fair one; whilst you do not go so far to deny the existence of forced prostitution in the UK entirely, you seek to minimise its scale and importance virtually to zero.

Your blog is lucid but I don’t find your reasoning any more convincing than I do the Poppy Project, which inhabits the other extreme – that of universality. I do not for one minute believe that forced prostitution is universal, that seems to me, ridiculous. I also deplore much of the politically motivated distortion of information they and others seem to have undertaken. You have covered this with skill.

However I do not believe your numbers either, nor do I accept your methodology. I believe you significantly underestimate the prevalence of forced prostitution.

Still, it is an interesting and well written position you take.